Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Scribe 11/29

Today...
-We ate our doughnuts!
-Smith collected our Act 2 quizzes.
-We read Act 3 scenes 1 and 2.
-There is no further reading tonight because we finished it in class.
*Hamlet paper people. You need to conference with Smith about you thesis before you start writing your final paper. The paper is dude DECEMBER 15!*

Monday, November 27, 2006

Hamlet Act 2 Blog Question

The ghost mentions that he is in a horrible place of judgment. Could Hamlet be resisting the urge to kill Claudius immediately because he does not want to withstand the same agony of his father? What might King Hamlet have done to deserve such a punishment?

Monday, November 20, 2006

Hamlet Fishbowl Act 2

Friday, November 17, 2006

Hamlet Act 1 Blog Question

Following today's fishbowl discussion of Hamlet and Claudius, consider the following connection: In Shakespeare's Macbeth, The King (Duncan) is murdered by Macbeth in order for Macbeth to take the throne and gain power. Macbeth's rule doesn't last, as everyone finds out how he gained power. One he is exposed as the murderer of the King, one of Duncan's sons avenges his father's death, and he takes the throne as the rightful heir. How does this situation relate to Hamlet? Do you think that Hamlet will follow through with the logical act of avenging his father's death, or will he continue to submit to fate? Do we see this same situation in modern day literature or entertainment (movies, TV, etc.)?

Hamlet Act 1 Fishbowl

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

11/13 Scribe

Scribe for November 13, 2006

Today we spent most of the hour figuring out the groups of leaders and discussers for Hamlet. Here are all the official groups;

Act One: Friday November 17th
Leaders: Scott, Kurt, Mark, Matt, Chris
Discussers: Levi, Dave L., Katie A., Amy B., Ashley G.,

Act Two: Monday November 27th
Leaders: Caitlin, Haley, Ashley, Steph, Emily
Discussers: LeAnne, Dave V., Chris, Hannah, Mark

Act Three: Monday December 4th
Leaders: Katie A, Amy B, Ashley G, Jeff G.
Discussers: Zach M, Amy King, Melissa B, Sonny, Kurt

Act Four: Monday December 11th
Leaders: Kyle, Andy, Hannah, Marie, Sonny
Discussers: Marina, Clair, Richard W., Matt W.

Act Five 1: Tuesday December 19th (Final)
Leaders: Zach M., Dave L, Dave V, Levi, Richard
Discussers: Ashley M, Emily, Andy, Caitlin, Scott

Act Five 2: Tuesday December 19th (Final)
Leaders: LeAnne, Amy King, Marina, Clair, Melissa
Discussers: Steph, Haley, Marie, Kyle, Jeff G


**For all the leaders of the fishbowl, you must come prepared with the following;**

*Criticism on your act
*A Syllabus
*Equality among the Leaders
*Create an in-depth Blogging question to post at the end of the period for everyone in the class to answer as homework

§ The outside circle will be live blogging on the laptops approximately 8-9 times but Ms. Smith going to grade on quality not quantity.
§ The inner circle will need to participate with prepared responses approximately 5 times but still quality not quantity
§ There will be a “Take Home Quiz” every fishbowl day


Hamlet:
The story starts with Hamlet Jr. off in college, his dad dies unexpectedly, and his mother remarries his Uncle (Dads Brother) after 2 months. This was hard to handle for Hamlet because he came from such a close relationship with his parents that to see his mother remarries that soon devastated him. Hamlet is also in love with a young woman named, Ophelia. She was a weak women but her dad is the right hand man to the king. But they were forbidden to be with each other because Hamlet was from royalty decent and Ophelia was not.

Hear is a small family tree to understand the story better:


Claudius Hamlet – Gertude Polonius
(Uncle) (dead)
Hamlet Jr. Laertes and Ophelia


Fortinbras *Hamlet and Fotinbras were in war and Fortinbras lost and
Died so Fortinbras jr. is out seeking revenge over his land
Fortinbras Jr.


§ The time frame from the story is in December
§ Hamlet is the epitome of a Shakespearian Hero
o Sickness and disease is carried through out the story

Act 1

§ Horatio is Hamlets friend who sees a ghost that appears to resembles Hamlet’s Father

We only read 2 pages so that is all that we really know right now

Homework: Read through Act 1, scene 1-2 by Wednesday

~Marina


Hamlet Leaders and Discussers Schedule
Act One: Friday November 17th
Leaders: Scott, Kurt, Mark, Matt, Chris
Discussers: Levi, Dave L., Katie A., Amy B., Ashley G.,

Act Two: Monday November 27th
Leaders: Caitlin, Haley, Ashley, Steph, Emily
Discussers: LeAnne, Dave V., Chris, Hannah, Mark

Act Three: Monday December 4th
Leaders: Katie A, Amy B, Ashley G, Jeff G.
Discussers: Zach M, Amy King, Melissa B, Sonny, Kurt

Act Four: Monday December 11th
Leaders: Kyle, Andy, Hannah, Marie, Sonny
Discussers: Marina, Clair, Richard W., Matt W.

Act Five 1: Tuesday December 19th (Final)
Leaders: Zach M., Dave L, Dave V, Levi, Richard
Discussers: Ashley M, Emily, Andy, Caitlin, Scott

Act Five 2: Tuesday December 19th (Final)
Leaders: LeAnne, Amy King, Marina, Clair, Melissa
Discussers: Steph, Haley, Marie, Kyle, Jeff G

Monday, November 13, 2006

11/10 Scribe

Scribe Friday November 10,2006

We ate cupcakes
We talked about Wednesday nights Prologue reading. Pg 123-127
Got into our Pilgrim groups and worked on our project.

Homework:
Canterbury Tale Formal Paper due Wednesday Nov 15
Locker Tags Due Monday 13

Wednesday, November 08, 2006

Scribe 11/06/06

I apologize for the inexcusable tardiness of this post; it just slipped my mind.

On Monday we continued discussing the Prologue of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. The pages covered were 111-116. Here are summaries of the characters in these pages:
The Monk: He ignores the rules of how monks should act. Instead of staying in the monastery and copying books he goes and hunts. The narrator points out that the Monk owns multiple "dainty" horses (i.e., thoroughbreds) and greyhounds, and also wears fine fur with a golden pin. These possessions indicate wealth, yet a true monk should be dirt poor. This indicates the Monk is probably embezzling money from the church. Also, the Monk is a hunter, even though church law says "hunters are not holy men" (line 182). The Monk is representative of the corrupted power of the church during Chaucer's time.
The Friar: Another character who shows the church's corruption. The Friar listens to people's confessions, and offers forgiveness, as long as they pay a fee (lines 225-226). He is a womanizer (or more likely, a creepy pedophile) who gives gifts of "pins for curls/And pocket-knives...to pretty girls" (lines 237-238). The narrator says the Friar spends more time hanging around bars and inns than helping the needy. He believes "nothing good can come/Of commerce with such slum-and-gutter dwellers,/But only with the rich and victual-sellers" (lines 250-252).
The Merchant: Gives a false appearance of being rich and well-off. In reality, the Merchant is flooded in debt. Chaucer says openly, "high on his horse he sat," indicating his attempt to give off an aura of pride and haughtiness (line 281). It's ironic that Chaucer placed the Monk and Merchant close to each other in the Prologue. We would expect the Monk to be poor and the Merchant to be rich, but the situation is the exact opposite.
The Oxford Cleric: He is a student. He pours all his money and energy into buying books and learning. He borrows money from his friends in order to buy books (keep in mind that books in this era were hand-copied, and therefore expensive). Despite all his knowledge, he keeps his mouth shut most of the time, never speaking "a word more than was need...Short, to the point, and lofty in his theme" (lines 314 & 316). As Smith would say, the Cleric is a bonafide, Grade-AA nerd.
The Serjeant (Sargeant): He is a master of the law. He serves as a justice in court, and delivers his verdict in black and white--there is no gray area for the Sargeant. The narrator says he "knew every judgement, case, and crime/Ever recorded since King William's time" (lines 333-334). The only "King William" I can think of is William the Conqueror, who we read about for background info. If this line is indeed referring to Willy the Conqueror, then the Sargeant knows about 300 years worth of court decisions--quite a feat. However, the narrator also says the Sargeant is "less busy than he seemed to be" (line 332). This continues a motif of deception and false appearances that Chaucer has carried through almost every character mentioned so far.
Once we finished our discussion on Canterbury Tales, we split into groups to work on our locker tag assignments. Each group picked a character from the Prologue to create a locker tag for. The locker tag is supposed to indicate the social status and abilities of the character, and also identify a vice (negative quality) that the character is trying to overcome. The tag should urge that character to defeat their vice (e.g., "Hey Friar! Stop mackin' on those young girls!"). Put some thought into your character's qualities. Make the tag colorful and creative. Be sure to urge your character with something better than the example I gave.

Monday, November 06, 2006

Scribe 11/27

Hey guys, sorry for the tardiness of this post. Here's the rundown of presentations for the 27th:

Haley presented first and she read Anna Karenina. The highlight of her presentation was her representation of the seven deadly sins on her box.

Clarie was up next; she read Les Miserables. Her cross symbol representing Jean Val Jean was great.

Emily read 100 Years of Solitude. She discussed a war in her book called the twenty years war.

Andy presented the Prince; he made a connection to Oedipus the King with a symbolic eye on his box.

Stephanie read the Kiterunner. She presented her book with a corduroy theme.

Marina read Les Miserables and tied all of her items together using a silverware motif.

I read Crime and Punishment and used a root beer bottle in my presentation.

LeAnne read Les Miserables also and she created a homemade Bible case to hold her copy of Les Mis.

Zach read Steppenwolf and covered all of his pieces of paper with fake fur. It was sweet.

David L. read The Trial and he used marriage stickers to represent infidelity.

Hannah read The Misanthrope and gave a unique perspective on the many love triangles in the novel.

Finally, Kyle was supposed to present but had no time. The highlight of his presentation was not having to present.

That's it guys. Awesome job on all the presentations!

Sunday, November 05, 2006

Scribe 11/3

Today in class we started off by choosing what we wanted to do with the final. Smith gave us 3 options:

1) Have a fish bowl discussion over Hamlet with blogging too and turn in a final paper over Hamlet.

2) Write the formal paper from Canterbury Tales. You can either choose the Prologue, the Pardoner's Tale (p.131), or The Wife of Bath's Tale (p.140)
~ the paper needs to have at least 8 quotes, all cited correctly
~ pre-approved thesis before beginning the paper from Smith
~ paper is due 11/13!

3) McConnell decided to come up with the class being able to decide which of the above options they wanted to do

There will be a fish bowl discussion lead by the class over Hamlet reguardless of which option you choose to do
~ there will be groups of 4-5. Each group will be responsible for covering an act in Hamlet and being prepared to teach the class!

After we finished discussing the final topics we handed in our modern pilgrim presentations. We started reading Canterbury Tales in class and got to p. 111.

HW: continue reading to p. 116. Make sure to take good notes on the characters that you're introduced to and anything else you feel neccessary.

(If you're going to Hawaii make sure you talk to Smith about what you want to do with the final)